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Student talents shine in Brandeis Korean Student Association’s annual showcase

By Emily Sorkin Smith

Section: Arts, Featured

April 13, 2018

With cool, sharp dance moves and quick hip-hop beats in contrast to elegant, graceful, traditional dancing showcased at this year’s K-Nite, the Brandeis Korean community proved it truly has idols among it. The Brandeis Korean Student Association (BKSA)’s biggest event of the year, BKSA K-Nite 2018: Idol School, showcased the range of talent its members have. K-Nite, held Thursday, March 29, brought together diverse elements of Korean culture, including a stunning traditional fan dance and the fan-favorite modern dance performances.


Behind each performance was a school-house backdrop, tying into the “Idol School” theme, and several groups performed in plaid skirts and other costumes reminiscent of typical school uniforms. The level of energy in the crowd, however, was far higher than most school classrooms might experience. This was especially true when the Berklee Band (from nearby Berklee College of Music) performed popular Korean songs, prompting an enthusiastic sing-along.

The show began with a short video in which members of the BKSA showcased their “talents,” notably including putting on sweatpants without hands, eating spicy noodles and singing some very high notes. Organizers asked the audience to vote for their favorite group, in the style of American Idol-type shows. BKSA President Dennis Kim ’19, Vice President Janice Nam ’19 and Senior Advisor Kevin Lee ’18 came out victorious with their unconventional yoga routine. Starting off on a silly note was just the right move for a show right before Passover break—the audience lost most of their post-midterm season tension and quickly got into the rhythm of the show.

It was the talented performers and engaged audience that helped K-Nite quickly push past some technical difficulties and a few awkward wait times between acts. These small setbacks did little to take away from the night’s overall success. By the time the show had ended and performers and the audience came together to eat a korean dinner together, the show’s high-points had far outshone its stumbles.

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