Beckinsale, Alda hold Q&A

December 5, 2008

<i>PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot</i>

PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot

The intimate Wasserman Cinemtheque was buzzing with excitement on Wednesday evening following the Boston premiere of the film Nothing But the Truth. Approximately 300 students, teachers, and members of the press eagerly awaited the arrival of the movie’s two main stars, Kate Beckinsale and Alan Alda, who visited Brandeis for a Q and A session – the fourth in a series made possible by the school’s partnership with the Los Angeles Times’ East Coast “Contender Q and A” events. Around 9:15, the stars arrived and took the stage with Brandeis Alum, Scott Feinberg, who currently covers the Academy Award race for the Los Angeles Times.

Alda, of MASH and West Wing, was relaxed and very witty the entire evening. Beckinsale, who starred in Serendipity and Underworld, was poised, polite, and humble – she appeared very real, with the exception of her unnatural beauty and waif-like figure. The actors had a good rapport and were clearly passionate about the film they were involved in together.

<i>PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot</i>

PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot

Nothing But the Truth, which is loosely based on the scandal between reporter Judith Miller and CIA operative Valerie Plame, attracted Alda and Beckinsale immediately. Beckinsale noted that there are rarely such profound and complex roles for women in film, so she appreciated the chance to sink her teeth into such an intense, strong-willed character. Alda was attracted to the movie’s focus on the First Amendment. Also, Alda said he appreciated the fact that Truth’s director, Rod Lurie, is a former “newspaperman.”

Alda said that, because of Lurie’s prior profession, the director “understands the problem at the heart of the movie: should we be put in danger of the truth not coming out…through control over sources?”

Alda, who is generating Oscar buzz for his performance, along with Beckinsale, said that he wanted to do this particular political-themed movie because it did not have an agenda. “I dislike strongly art that is propaganda…I am much more interested in exploring the human condition.”

Alda, a prolific actor, also has the accomplishment of writer under his belt; he has written two books and five film scripts, and is currently working on writing a play. Beckinsale can next be seen in the films White Out and Everything is Fine.

<i>PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot</i>

PHOTO BY Napoleon Lherisson/The Hoot



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