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Brandeis faculty meeting motions: Jan. 19

This article serves to hold the text of the motions that were discussed at Jan. 19’s faculty meeting. This article includes the text of motions one, two, four, five and six.

Motion one text: “We move that the Provost and the Senate together establish a new Task Force on Free Expression in order to come up with a set of recommendations for how to revise and reinterpret the Principles of Free Speech and Free Expression. The Task Force shall also issue recommendations for what the appropriate consequences are for a violation of these principles (for instance, whether they ought to include disciplinary action by the University or the involvement of campus or city police.) Like the original task force, the reconstituted version shall have broad representation of students, faculty and staff. The Task Force shall include subject matter experts both internal and external if needed, with the latter to be funded by the University. The Task Force shall deliver its report by the end of the academic year. Finally, the Task Force shall focus attention on the tensions between Principle 6 and the other principles.”

At the vote that motion one passed on Nov. 17 of last year, 84 percent of faculty voted for the motion, 12% of faculty voted against the motion, and 4% of faculty abstained, with a total of 263 votes tallied.

Motion two text: “We move that the Administration commission a thorough independent investigation–to be shared with the Brandeis community in written form by March 1, 2024–of its decision-making, communications, and other consequential acts leading up to and including the events of November 10. The inquiry shall include close examination of the police actions on that day, process around police presence and training, and factors such as public statements and confidential decision-making by the administration that may have contributed to an escalation of tension. The Senate shall participate in defining the scope and charge of the investigation and in choosing outside investigators capable of addressing all relevant issues; the charge will include proposed remedies that may help avoid similar incidents in the future and alleviate harm caused when similar situations occur.”

At the vote that motion two passed on Nov. 17 of last year, 81% of faculty voted for the motion, 13% of faculty voted against the motion, and 6% of faculty abstained, with a total of 265 votes tallied.

Motion four text: “We move that Student Life and other administrative offices simultaneously share with faculty and staff any communications with students about decisions that will have a significant impact on student life.”

At the vote that motion four passed on Nov. 17 of last year, 88% of faculty voted for the motion, 7% of faculty voted against the motion, and 6% of faculty abstained, with a total of 264 votes tallied.

Motion five text: “We move that Brandeis University administration call on the Middlesex District Attorney Marian Ryan to drop all the charges against those Brandeis students arrested on the Brandeis campus on November 10, 2023 and that Brandeis University decline to cooperate with the prosecution of our students. These actions are essential to begin the process of healing that President Liebowitz called for in his November 11 message to campus.”

At the vote that motion five passed on Dec. 8 of last year, 73% of faculty voted for the motion, 18% of faculty voted against the motion and 9% of faculty abstained, with a total of 197 votes tallied.

Motion six text: “We move that Brandeis University not take any disciplinary action against the students arrested on the Brandeis campus on November 10, 2023. The university has a duty to protect and care for all our students. Not pursuing disciplinary action is an opportunity to repair the harm that has been done and heal our campus community, leading not with punishment but care.”

At the vote that motion five passed on Dec. 8 of last year, 68% of faculty voted for the motion, 22% of faculty voted against the motion and 11% of faculty abstained, with a total of 197 votes tallied.

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